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Full text of "The McKendrean : being the year book of McKendree College"

Ref . 

LD 
3141 
.M37 
1947 



19 



i^S 




£ 



M^f 



3 College 
Lebanon. IL 62254 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

CARLI: Consortium of Academic and Research Libraries in Illinois 



http://www.archive.org/details/mckendreanbeingy47mcke 



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lEWfl 



IRLEIEE 




Each fall McKendree's gate sees a class enter to be trained to be ot 
service to God and their fellowmen. Each spring this same gate sees another 
class being sent forth with an education to be of service in the field for which 
they are best suited. 

It was not all work. The leadership and participation in all activities 
will enable all young men and women to be of service to their community. 
The atmosphere of peacefulness and friendship within these gates will inspire 
them to live such lives with friends and families as they go through life. 



McKENDREAN STAFF 

Dorothy Lee Faulkner -------- Editor 

Janelle Kleinschmidt ----- Assistant Editor 

Leslie Purdy ------- Business Manager 

George Troutt - - - Assistant Business Manager 
Louis Walker ------ Advertising Manager 

Sam Simpson - - Assistant Advertising Manager 
David Brink ------ Circulation Manager 

Betsy Crisp - - Assistant Circulation Manager 
Paul Salmon --------- Sports Editor 

Becky Giles -------- Make-up Editor 

Doris Phillips Brown ------ Class Editor 

Blaine Kennedy -------- Photography 

Joanne Bare ------ Organization Editor 

Jim Oppitz --------- Feature Editor 

Mrs. H. C. Gutekunst - - - - Faculty Advisor 

VOLUME XV New Series 



Pictures by Voegele's Studio, Highland 
Engraving by Central Engraving Co., St. Louis 
Printing by Roling Printing Co., Inc., St. Louis 
Covers by Becktold, St. Louis 




S. NELL C. OPPITZ 



We, of McKendree, proudly dedicate this 1947 Mc- 
Kendrean to you. To us you are one of the best teachers 
here on the Old Hill. 

While here at McKendree, you have taught us not 
merely one subject but any requested. Your willingness 
to help has been greatly appreciated by us. 



To you, a war mother, a Christian leader, and 
pillar of McKendree, we pay this tribute. 



Iltllll 




J~or Jsn5pi ration and Ljuida 



nee 



Steadies Thin Man Beau Brummel Ma 

Someone's out of step Efficiency 

W.P.A.? Parade Sheepskin Day Signed E. J. D. 




fifl 



Dr. Carl C. Bracy. President 
A.B., M.Th., D.D. 



Charles Jacob Stowell, Dean 
B.S., A.M., Ph.D. 
Mathematics and Economics 



Reinhold Barrett Hohn, Registrar 
A.B., A.M. 
Education and Psychology 



Eliza J. Donaldson, Comptroller 
B.S., A.M. 
Accounting 



[ill 




Oliver Henry Kleinschmidt, A.A.bO 

Piano, Theory, Organ 



Nell Griswold Oppitz, AB , AM 

History and Sociology 



William Clarence Walton, 

AB, AM, PhD., D.D. 
Greek and Latin 

Dorothy West Hohn, BS, A.M., PhD 
English 



Edwin Percy Baker, Dtan Emeritus 
A.B., AM, LL.D. 
German 

F. C. Stelzriede, A.B., B.D. 

Speech and Dramatics 



Bertha Ward Gutekunst, A B. 

French and Spanish 



Helmut C. Gutekunst, B.S., MS 

Chemistry and Physics 



Roland Preston Rice, 

BA, S.T.B., S.T.D. 
Philosophy and Religion 



[Him 




Elizabeth White Parks, AB, MA 

English and Journalism 



Eula R. Smith, Ph.M., B M., M.A. 
Voice and Public School Music 



Wesley Jonah, B P. E., M.A. 
Physical Education Instructor 
Athletic Director 

Carla Caldwell, B.M 

Chorus, Band, Sextette 



Lawrence Fox, A.B., M.A. 

History, Economics, Sociology 



Beatrice Attey Godwin, A I 
Librarian 



Grace Renner Welch, AB, MS. 

English 



Lewis Winterrowd, AB 
Carnegie Hall Proctor 



Blanche Hertenstein 

Housemother 



U L 



[ 




Pc 



au6e ai 



Cjo ^Jnrouak the Ljatt 



SOPHOMORES 

D. Brown, Pres. 
M. Hilton, V. Pres. 
D. Hinson, Sec.-Treas. 



JUNIORS 

L. Walker, Pres. 

E. Hanbaum, V. Pres. 

B. Crisp, Sec.-Treas. 



FRESHMEN 

R. Nelson, Pres. 
H. Poole, V. Pres. 
L. Wilson, Sec. 
J. Curtis, Treas. 



SENIORS 

J. Oppitz, Pres. 
L. Krumeich, V. Pres. 
M. Michels, Treas. 
D. Faulkner, Sec. 




niiiin 



JAMES OPPITZ 
Lebanon 



A.B. 
Economics 

Pi Kappa Delta, President '41, '47; Sigma Tau Delta; 
Alpha Psi Omega, Director '46; Review, Editor '41 -42; 
Philo, President '41, '46; Little Theatre; McKendree 
Radio Theatre '40; Debate '40-'42, '47; Gl Club; 
President Senior Class; President Student Body '47; 
Student Faculty Council '41 -'42; McKendrean Feature 
Editor '47; First Prize Dorns Oratorical Contest '40; 
"Fresh Fields," "Wurhering Heights," "She Stoops to 
Conquer," "Our Town," "Troian Wom.n," "Pink and 
Patches," "Man in Bowler Hat," "Blithe Spirit"; Who's 
Who Among Students in American Universities and 
Colleges. 

MARY ELLEN GLOTFELTY A.B. 

Greenville Music 

Glee Club '39-'42; Sextette '40-'42; Little Theatre '40- 
42; Clio '40-'42, '45-'47; Alpha Psi Omega '46-'47; 
Student Faculty Council '42; Y.W C A. '39-'41; "Our 
Town." 

REBECCA GILES A.B. 

Galesburg English 

Review '43-'46, Editor '45-'46; McKendrean '43-'47; 

Sigma Tau Delta '44-'47, President '46; Clio 43-'47, 

President '46; Y.W.CA. '43-'46; S.C.A. '46-'47; 
W.A.A. '44-'46; President of Class '44-'45; Who's Who 
in American Universities and Colleges. 

PAUL C. SALMON A.B. 

Mound City Chemistry 

Basketball '41 -'43; Plato '41 -'43, '46-'47. 



BERNARD LOGAN B.S. 

Lebanon Biology 

Philo Vice-President; Track '42; Basketball '46; "M" 
Club '42, '46-'47. 



LOUISE KARRAKER A.B. 

Lebanon English 

Glee Club '42-'43, '46; Sextette '43, '46; Clio '42-'43, 
'46-'47, President '47; Review Staff '42-'43, '46; Mc- 
Kendrean '46; Sigma Tau Delta '43, '45-'47; Assistant 
Registrar '43, '45-'47; Cheerleader '46; Clark Hall 
President '46; Vice-President Senior Class; Student 
Faculty Council. 



WYVONA LUMAN A.B. 

Woodriver Sociology 

Clio '43-'47, President '45; Y.W C A '43-'46, Secre- 
tary-Treasurer '44; I.S.S. '44-'47. President '14, Chorus 
Pianist '44; Sigma Tau Delta '45-'47; Student Faculty 
Council '44; Review Typist 14, President Junior Class 



ARTHUR P. HINSON B.S. 

Madison Biology 

Football '40-'42; Plato '41 -'43, '46 47, Basketball '42 
'43; Sigma Zeta '46-M7; "M" Club. 



I I 



LESLIE E. PURDY A.B. 

Lebanon History 

President of Carnegie Hall '46; First Honors Dorris Oratorical 
'46; First Honors McCormack Oratorical '46; Philo '46-'47, Presi- 
dent '46, President of Student Body '46; Business Manager Mc- 
Kendrean '47; Student Faculty Council '46; Review Staff; Ex- 
Gl Club; Who's Who in American Universities and Colleges. 



MIRIAM J. MICHELS 
Carlyle 



A.B. 

Music 



Sigma Tau Delta '44-'47, President '45-'46; Alpha Psi Omega '46- 
'47; Y.W.C.A. '45-'46, President '46; S.C.A. '46-'47, Chapel 
Choir '44-'47; Piano Quartet '45- '47; Glee Club '45-'46; Girls' 
Sextette '44-'46; I.S.S. '43 -'45; W.A.A. '45-'47; Clio '45-'47, 
President '47; Accompanist '43, '47; President of Clark Hall '47; 
"Blithe Spirit"; May Queen '47; Who's Who in American Univer- 
sities and Colleges. 



DON TROWBRIDGE 

Maroa 



A.B. 
Philosophy and Religion 



FRANCESCA SHAFFER A.B. 

Murphysboro English 

Y.W.C.A. '43-'47; Glee Club '44-'47; W.A.A. '44-'46; I.S.S. '44- 
'47; Clio '44-'47. 



JOANNE BARE A.B. 

Jonesboro Sociology 

IS S '43-'47, President '46-'47; Y.W.C.A. '43 -'46; S.CA. '46- 
'47; Clio '43-'47; Alpha Psi Omega '46-'47; Sigma Tau Delta 
'46-'47; McKendrean Staff '45-'46; Glee Club '43 -'47; Chapel 
Choir '46-'47; Sextette '45-'46; "Drums of Death," "Christmas 
at Home," "Blithe Spirit." 



DOROTHY LEE FAULKNER A.B. 

Granite City Music 

Editor McKendrean '47; Clio '44-'47, President '46; Y.W.C.A. 
'43-'45; Sextette '46-'47; Glee Club '43- '47; W.A.A. '44-'47, 
President '44-'46; I.S.S. '43 -'47; Alpha Psi Omega '46-'47, Director 
'47; Cheerleader '45-'47; Sigma Tau Delta '47; Second Attendant, 
Home-coming Queen '45; Maid-of-Honor to May Queen '47; Mc- 
Kendree Review Advisory Committee '46; Secretary Senior Class; 
Accompanist '44-'47. 



ALLEN SAGER A.B. 

Lebanon History 

Glee Club 38-39, '46-'47, President '46; McKendree Male 
Quartette '38-39; Little Theatre '38-39; Philo 38-39, '46-'47, 
Gl Club '46-'47. 



BETTY LOUISE FORD 
East St. Louis 



A.B. 
Spanish 

Vice-President I.S.S. '46-'47; Glee Club '46- '47; Sextette Ac- 
companist '46; Cheerleader '46; Y.W.C.A.; Piano Quartet '45-'47. 





Harry Oli 



n 



Clyde Funkhouser 



George Trourt 



James Weldon 



Donald Lowe 



Paul Sii 



Eunice Hanbaum 

Fern Klopmeyer 

Paul Buchanar 



Janelle Klcmschmi.it 

Elizabeth Crisp 



Donald Cramer 

Louis Pureed 

Warren Beckemeyer 



SOPHOMORES 




Doris Phillips Brown 

Kenneth Walters 

Barbara Bailey 

Edward Souders 

Edward Cockrel 



Holt Gay, Jr. 

Thomas Sowers 

Dale Huff 

Dale Bailey 

Mason Holmes 



Harold Affsprung 
Charles Schwarz 
Dorothy Hinson 

Jean Smith 
Billy Gene Hahs 



Wesley Stelzriede 

Doris Goddard 

Mary Lou Pummill 

Samuel Simpson 

John Krumeich 



Victor Donaldson 
Don Benitone 

Mary Ruth Hilton 

James Reizer 

David Brink 



FRESHMEN 




Marion Farmer 


Andrew Geist 


William Pitts 


Ronald Driggers 


Robert Nelson 


Howard Hursey 


Milo Wadsworth 


Frank Finkbiner 


Burnell Heinecke 


Pauline Cozart 


Don Wehrle 


Lowell Grissom 


Charles Fox 


Nelson Bunnage 


Marion Ruth 


Harold Wiegmann 


Harold Oppitz 


James R. Lamb 


Richard Townsend 


Mabel Cozart 


Emmett Schmitt 


Beverly Bagwell 


Thomas Buchheim 


John Winkler 


Robert Steen 



FRESHMEN 



Jack Holt 

Mary Alexander 

Arleen Arter 

Allen Bailey 

Ernst Bailey 



Gerald Barthel 
Joseph Roberts 

Robert Brann 
Martha Voyles 

Robert Reizer 



Charles Matthews 
Kenneth Austin 

Betty Bugh 
Harold Briggs 
Jerome Podesva 



Robert Simpson 

Mary Margaret Small 

Marilyn Struthers 

Robert Hernandez 

William Togias 



James Weiss 

Theodore Sleeper 

Elvis Rosenberger 

William Gilomen 

Ruth Gent 



IjkSIv 




F H E .S H M E N 




Lee Anderson 

Edward Kimmle 

Robert Berry 

Stanley Holzhauer 

Gene Houser 



Glenn Freiner 

Cranston Smith 

Lorraine Wilson 

Wilier Dean 

Paul Whitney 



Richard Walton 

John Richichi 

Golden Zike 

Roger Steele 

Newnan Thompson 



Lloyd Bollinger 

John Curtis 

John Ditterline 

Jay Halcomb 

Ella Ruth Jones 



Alfred Crays 
Norman Prosser 
Maxine Gilomen 
William Gregory 

Blaine Kennedy 



FRESHMEN 



Masaichi Katayama 

John W. Ridgway 

Beryl Seabury 

Randel Rock 



Novella McRaven 
Eugene Scruggs 

Hal Poole 
Steve Hustava 
Lauren Berger 



Dale Hirsch 

Marian Matthies 

Helen Irvin Poole 

Harold Skelton 

Dennis Ramsey 



George Mitchell 

Eugene Black 

Joseph Biedenbach 

Robert Sager 

Pat Ladas 



Lavern Ballard 

Carmen Stelzriede 

George Lienesch 

Frances Wilson 





ISBWfP 







Roy Katayama Don Fisher 




Ancel Arnold Marvin Crowe 


Claire Clark 


Sherman Jones Joe Lagow 




Edward Adams Donald Zimmerlee 


Corinne Mooneyham 


Darrell Sample 




Don Brown Joseph Poelker 




SENIORS HAVING NO PICTURES 




LEONA BECK 


A.B. 


WILBERT CANNON 


A.B. 


Lebanon 


English 


Warren, N. H. Philosophy 


and Religion 


CHARLES RIPPEL 


A.B. 


EUGENE RODEMICH 


A.B. 


Moberly, Missouri 


Education 


Dupo 


History 


JOHN JOSEPH FIZZELL 


A.B. 


MYRL HERMAN 


A.B. 


Marissa 


Voice 


Lebanon 


History 







M 




**j3 2 



»*1 

Far -* 





^J\eep dSu5ii lA/ltn LJur Studied (/Dut 



2D V-JU6U 



Twice a week 



Philo's Sta 
Can You Spare a Dime? Hail, Hail — 



Strangers? Tug-of-War 

TK and the Wagon Warmer Inside 
Poole's We Three 

Study Hours The Elite 

Bubble Bath Mary'll Bring the Duck 10-Minute Break Amen Twins? 



SIGMA TAU DELTA 




SEATED (left to right): L. Krumeich, J. Kleinschmidt, 
Brown, J. Oppitz, M. Michels, E. Hanbaum. 



E. Crisp, W. Luman, J. Bare, Mrs. Hohn, R. Giles. STANDING 



Stelzricde, D. 



SIGMA TAU DELTA 

The lota Delta chapter of Sigma Tau Delta, honorary English 
fraternity, has continued in its position as one of the leading or- 
ganizations on the campus during this, its eleventh year. 

This group has studied literary classics and contemporary litera- 
ture in order to develop a greater appreciation of the leading mas- 
ters in the field of writing. Original compositions have also been 
presented to the group and several have been printed in the 
Rectangle, the national fraternity publication. 



ALPHA PSI OMEGA 

The Alpha Thcta Cast of Alpha Psi Omega, national honorary 
diamatic fraternity, snapped out of wartime inactivity with the 
pledging of several new members and the planning of college dra- 
matics. The organization sponsored a theater party to the Ameri- 
can Theater in St. Louis and made arrangements for the production 
of either a three-act or several one-act plays during the second 
semester of the school year. 



ALPHA PSI OMEGA 




Left to right: J. 



e, M. Michels, D. Faulkner, J. Oppitz, Mr. Stelzriede, Mrs. Welch, B. Stelzriede. 



SIGMA ZETA 




Left to right. A, Hinson, Prof. H. C. Gutekunst, Dr. C J. Stowell. 



SIGMA ZETA 

Sigma Zeta is a national honorary science society whose purpose 
is to encourage scientific study and to recognize students of high 
scholarship in the natural sciences and mathematics. The Beta 
chapter at McKendree College was organized in 1926. 

Officers: President, first semester, no election; second semester, 
Arthur Hinson; Recorder-Treasurer, Dean C. J. Stowell. Other mem- 
bers are Prof. H. C. Gutekunst, Prof. S. M. McClure and Dr. E. R. 
Spencer. 



PHILOSOPHIAN LITERARY SOCIETY 

Swelled by the addition of many returning servicemen, Philo, one 
of America's oldest college organizations, spent an active year. 
Four Open Sessions were held by the 110-year old society, including 
the Glenn McCormack Oratorical Contest, held annually in memory 
of a Philosophian killed during the first World War. Philo also co- 
operated with the other societies in presenting the Home-coming 
and Commencement exhibitions and in a joint banquet during the 
spring. 



PHILO 



■IP 


W ft i 







FIRST ROW (left to right): T Sowers, S Simpso 
Logan, G. Hartman, J. Krumeich. THIRD ROW: L. 



D Lowe, A Ceist, Dr Walton SECOND ROW: Mr. Stelznede, T. 
Purdy, C. Funkhouser, M. Holmes, G. Freiner, A. Sager, J. Oppitz. 



CLIO 




FIRST ROW (left to right): D Faulkner, L. Krumeich SECOND ROW: W. Luman, B Stelzriede, J. Bare, M. Hilton, D. Hmson, M Pum- 
mil R. Giles. THIRD ROW: D. Goddard, J Smith, F. Shaffer, J. Kleinschmidt, D. Brown, M. Michels, E. Crisp. 



CLIONIAN LITERARY SOCIETY 

When September of 1946 rolled around, the Clio members found 
it was the natural thing to enter Clio Hall for regular weekly meet- 
ings. Once again Clio made its place on McKendree's campus. 

Highlights of a successful year were its two initiations, four Open 
Sessions, and its literary programs which were both serious and 
light. There is a spirit of fellowship, loyalty and cooperation which 
makes Clio an outstanding organization on the Old Hill 



PLATONIAN LITERARY SOCIETY 



raditional way, has seen many improve- 
;rans have joined the ranks of Plato's 



Plato, carrying on in 
ments. Many promising 
McKendreans 

Plato's achievements are many. Among these we find the adopt- 
ing of a new constitution heading the list. It has kept the fine 
tradition of good sportsmanship and at the same time topped the 
list in literary skill. 



PLATO 




SEATED (left to right)- H. Poole, D. Benitone, P. Ladas, L. Crouch, H. Affsprung, A. Hinson, J. Roberts. STANDING: G. Barthel, R. 
Nelson, P. Whitney, W. Togias, W. Clark, L. Walker, V. Donaldson, D. Huff, G. Troutt. 



S . C . A 




SEATED (left to right): G. Lagow, M Michels, D. Low*. STANDING: V. Riley, D Huff, R. Giles, G. Fremer, E. Hanbaum. 



STUDENT CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 

"In Unity There Is Strength!" This year saw the birth of the 
Student Christian Association as the two Y's combined in order to 
bring a higher type of religious program to our Christian fellowship. 

The S.C.A. held regular Wednesday evening devotional services 
featuring a varied and talented group of speakers, and sponsored 
several successful all-school parties. 



INTERNATIONAL STUDENT SOCIETY 

The International Student Society, now in its fourth year, is an 
organization to promote fellowship among students of all lands. 

Membership is limited to those who have had at least one year 
of foreign language and who are willing to correspond with foreign 
students. 

In its monthly meetings the society studies other countries and 
tries to gain a better understanding of their problems. It also 
sponsored an assembly program. 



I . s . s 




SEATED (left to right): E Crisp, J. Kleinschmidt, W. Luman, R. Hernandez, D. Faulkner, J Bare, L Walker, G. Lagow. STANDING: 
L. Purdy, Mrs. Gutekunst, G. Troutt, F. Shaffer, E. Hanbaum, D. Goc'dard, W. Beckemeyer, B. Ford, D. Brown. 



I . C L U 




SEATED (left to right): E. Rosenberger, J Richichi, A. Geist, J. Krumeich, S. Simpson, D. Benitone, A. Sager, L Purdy SECOND 
ROW: S. Holzhauser, T. Sowers, D. Lowe, H Affsprung, B Kennedy, C. Fox, R. Simpson, L. Strain, J. Oppitz, V Donaldson, T Bruno 
THIRD ROW: D. Huff, B. Logan, L. Berger, R. Hauser, J. Reizer, T. Sleeper, R. Townsend, N. Thompson. 



McKENDREE G. I. CLUB 

The McKendree Ex-G. I. Club opened its second semester of 
activity on September 17, 1946. 

Numerous school activities were planned and sponsored, including 
skating parties, a chapel program, a ping-pong tournament, and an 
intramural basketball program. A formal banquet was held for all 
members and their dates at the close of the first semester. 

Dean Charles J. Stowell was given an honorary membership for 
outstanding service to McKendree veterans. 



STUDENT FACULTY COUNCIL 

The Student Faculty Council is responsible for creating greater 
understanding between the faculty and the students on the campus 
A democratic organization, the Council discusses current campus 
problems and possible solutions. The organization also planned the 
Thanksgiving Dinner. 

The Council consists of six faculty members, chosen by the 
President and Chairman of the Council, Dr. Bracy, and six members 
representing six groups of students. 



STUDENT FACULTY COUNCIL 




FIRST RO\ 
Dr. Rice. 



ft to right): Mrs. Godwin, J. Oppitz, A. Hinson, E. Hanbaum, Dean Baker. SECOND ROW: L. Walker, L. Purdy, Hoh 



REVIEW STAFF 




Left to right: M. Matthies, J. Holt, Mrs. Parks, E. Kimmle, B. Seabury, A. Geist, D. Lowe, M. Ruth. 



REVIEW STAFF 

Starting with an untrained staff, the McKendree Review had, by the 
end of the first semester, published seven issues, two of which were six-page 
issues. One celebrated the twenty-fifth anniversary of the founding of the 
McKendree Review on November 15, 1921; the other was published preceding 
home-coming. The staff were guests of Mr. and Mrs. F. A. Behmyer. Mr. 
Behymer is a feature writer on the St. Louis Post-Dispatch. They were also 
guests of Mr. and Mrs. Leon Church of the Lebanon Advertiser, who initiated 
the group into the intricacies of the country weekly. 

Plans were made to publish at least two more six-page issues during 
the second semester. One will be the Commencement Issue which will be 
distributed on Commencement Day. 



Managing Editor - - - - - Andrew Geist 

Desk Editor ------ Marian Matthies 

Feature Editor - ----- Edward Kimmle 

Sports Editor - - - - Donald Lowe- 

Assistant Sports Editor ----- Ralph Votrain 

Copy Editor ------- Jack Holt 

Typist - ------- Marion Ruth 

Assistant Editors - - Beryl Seabury, Charles HoltkamD 

Advertising Manager ------ Jean Harris 

Circulation Manager ------ Jack Holt 

Adviser - ----- Elizabeth White Parks 



McKENDREAN STAFF 




SEATED (left to irght) : D. Brown, D. Faulkner, L. Purdy, G. Truutt 
Kleinschmidt, L. Walker, J. Oppltz, E. Crisp, Mrs. Gutekunst. 



STANDING: S. Simpson, J. Bare, B. Kennedy, R. Giles, D. Brink, J. 



McKENDREAN STAFF 

We all look back on being on the McKendrean Staff and working to- 
gether even though there was a lot of worry. Getting out an Annual isn't as 
easy as it sounds. Securing a photographer to come to the school to take 
pictures of all the students and organizations was merely one of our many 
"headaches." Many afternoons were used in making trips to St. Louis to 
arrange for the printing and the engraving. Other afternoons were given to 
securing ads. Meeting deadlines with the engraver and the printer was a 
job, but we finally made it. 



An all-school stunt show was sponsored by the members of the staff 
the second semester. We, the 1947 McKendrean Staff, hope you enjoy the 
annual as much as we enjoyed getting it out. We sincerely hope that the 
memories in these pages will long remind all of that wonderful year together 
on the Old Hill. 






u 



AND 




SEATED (left to right): C. Stelzriede, R Sterling, T. Buchheim, B. Heinecke, D. Ramsey, F. Muckey. STANDING: H. Skelton, J. Curtis, 
J. Bare, J. Smith, W. Stelzriede, D. Brink, Miss Caldwell. 



IV 



au5 ^Jime for a cLlttle L^ulc 



are 



GLEE C L U 




FIRST ROW (left to right): L. Wilson, B Bagwell, E. Jones, N. McRaven, J. Bare, Miss Caldwell, M. Pummil, M. Voyles, C Stelznede, 
M. Hilton. SECOND ROW: N Thompson, G. Freiner, N. Prosser, J. Smith, M. Alexander, B. Bugh, J. McAfee, M. Cozart, F. Shaffer, W. 
Edwards, R. Brann, B. Russell, W. Stelzriede. THIRD ROW: H. Skelton, C. Fox, R. Steen, R. Townsend, D. Ramsey, A. Sager, J. Ridgeway, 
R. Sager, H. Hursey. 



GLEE CLUB 

The College Chorus, under the direction of Miss Carla Caldwell, 
enjoyed a successful 1946-47 season. 

The highlight of the season was the presentation of Handel's 
immortal oratorio, "The Messiah," on December 15. 

The chorus provided special music in the Chapel and Assembly 
programs on several occasions. In addition, several trips were made 
in the second semester to surrounding churches. A spring concert 
of contemporary American music highlighted the activities of the 
chorus in the second semester. 



GIRLS' SEXTETTE 

The Girls' Sextette has provided music for special school occa- 
sions and has, upon special request, represented the college in out- 
side communities. 

Any college woman is eligible to become a member of the 
sextette. The final decision for membership is left to the director. 

Six melodious girls' voices have blended together this past year 
for enjoyment and performance under the direction of Miss Carla 
Caldwell. 



SEXTETTE 




Left to right: M. Pummil, J. McAfee, J. Klemschmidt, M. Cozart, J. Smith, D. Faulkner, G Fremcr. 







I 




^4 oLlttie l^tau ^Jo ^J\eep Ul5 ^J/rom Ljettina ^JJu 



Deserted Old, Old Eisenmctyer 

— Whole Darn Team! First and Ten 

Rosie, the Riveter Ugh!! 

End Run We wanted a touchdown 



FOOTBALL 




PAUL WHITNEY, Freshman Mr. Vernon 

Guard One-year Letterman 

Hailing from Mt. Vernon, Whitney was a 
dependable man on both defense and of- 
fense His line play at guard was well above 
average. 



ERNST "CORKY" BAILEY, Freshman 

New Baden Fullback One-year Letterman 

Playing under a handicap of a weak ankle, 
"Cork was still a big gun in the Bearcats' 
backfield. "Cork" could pass, punt and 
place-kick with more than average ability 



GOLDEN ZIKE, Freshman Venice 

Tackle One-year Letterman 

"Goldie," the biggest linesman on the team, 
was a reliable man on the gridiron. "Goldie" 
will be around for three more years, and 
should see lots of action on the Bearcats' 



BOB SIMPSON, Freshman Millstadt 

Guard One-year Letterman 

Bob appeared in uniform late, but was 
soon on par with the other boys Lacking 
experience, Bob was willing to learn, and 
was very sincere in his play. Bob's defen- 
sive play was above average in every game 
he played. 



ELVIS "ROSIE" ROSENBERGER, Freshman 
Centralia Halfback One-year Letterman 

Being the smallest man in the backfield 
didn't hold "Rosie" back. "Rosie" was one 
of the scrappiest men on the squad. His 
specialty was end runs and line plunges. His 
never-give-up spirit, his drive and defensive 
ability were outstanding. 



JOHN HUFF, Freshman Granite City 

Quarterback One-year Letterman 

Huff was a good ball carrier, and one of 
the most consistent ground gainers for the 
Bearcats. Alternating with Briggs at the 
signal calling post, Huff proved himself a 
capable leader. 



RICHARD PITTENGER, Freshman 
Pocahontas Guard One-year Letterman 

A Pocahontas lad, Pittenger played his 
first football this year. A hard blocker and 
a very good defensive man, Pittenger took 
more than his share of the line on defense. 
Pittenger was the most improved player on 
the team at the close of the season. 



HOWARD HURSEY, Freshman 

East St. Louis Guard One-year Letterman 

"Mad -dog" was the roughest linesman on 
the team. Although his play was limited 
because of a bad knee and ankle, he was 
rough and full of pep. Hursey did a lot to 
keep the spirit of the team at a high level 



MASON HOLMES, Freshman East St. Louis 
Center One-year Letterman 

"Mace" was a mighty good man at the 
pivot spot. His undying spirit and defen- 
sive ability were outstanding. "Mace" shoula 
prove a valuable asset to the building of 
next year's squad. 



KENNETH AUSTIN, Freshman Evansville 

Tackle One-year Letterman 

One of the heaviest linesmen on the 
team, Ken plugged holes on defense and 
opened holes on offense. Fighting all the 
time, Ken was strictly a team man and 
fought to win. 




BILL TOGIAS, Freshman East St. Louis 

End One-year Letterman 

Bill was a good pass-snatcher, and a hard 
man for the opposition to circle. Bill did 
more than his share to keep the team's 
spirit up. Hard tackles were the big spe- 
cialty produced by Togias. 



GENE KALTENBRONN, Freshman 

New Baden End One-year Letterman 

A New Baden product appeared on the 
gridiron for the first time this year. An 
eager listener and one willing to learn, Kal- 
tenbronn became a very effective man at 
end on both offense and defense. He will 
be a big asset to the Bearcats his next 
three years. 




JOE BIEDENBACH, Freshman 

New Baden End One-year Letterman 

Another New Baden product, Joe was a 
rough, hard-tackling man on defense and a 
hard blocker on offense. A lot can be ex- 
pected from this gridder in the coming 
years. 



BILL SAVITT, Freshman East St. Louis 

Fullback One-year Letterman 

Bill was the fastest man on the Bearcats' 
team. His specialty was hitting the line 
and he was a threat to the opposition at 
all times. Savitt should prove a valuable 
cog in building next year's squad. 



ACTING CAPTAIN GENE BRIGGS 
Freshman Granite City 

Quarterback One-year Letterman 

Briggs was one of the most versatile of 
the Bearcat backs, plunging, punting, run- 
ning the ends, and tossing passes Briggs, 
as a signal caller, proved himself a spirited 
and smart leader on the gridiron. Gene per- 
formed all functions with plenty of scrap 
for his team and his school. 



BILL NAGEL, Freshman Lebanon 

Halfback One-year Letterman 

Playing football for the first time, Nagle 
was willing to learn and improved with each 
game. Bill did practically all of the punting 
and passing for the Bearcats, getting off 
several long punts and completing numerous 
passes for lots of yardage. Nagle should do 
big things on the gridiron next year. 



ANTHONY MARKARIAN, Freshman 

Oak Park Halfback One-year Letterman 

"Mark" was a very capable man in the 
backfield. If given more of a chance, he 
could have become a triple-threat back. 
His drive, fight and ability were outstand- 
ing Suffering from a broken nose, "Mark" 
was forced to retire from football before 
the close of the season. 



FOOTBALL SCHEDULE 

McK. Opp 

Millikin _ _ 39 

Macomb _ 14 

Quincy _ ___ 14 

Principia _._ 44 



FOOTBALL 




FIRST ROW (left to right): W. Gregory, H. Hursey, C. Fox, W. Wright, M. Holmes, E. Rosenberger, P. Buchanan, W. Nagles, R. Pit- 
tenger. SECOND ROW: R. Brann, Coach Jonah, K. Harlan, E. Briggs, R. Simpson, W. Biedenbach, E. Kaltenbronn, E. Bailey, G. Zike, K. 
Austin, P. Ladas, A. Hinson, J. Richichi. THIRD ROW: J. Huff, J. Winkler, W. Togias, L. Anderson, P. Witney, R. Sager, W. Savitt, H. Gay. 

"M" CLUB 

The "M" Club is an organization of lettermen whose purpose is the 
promotion of good sportsmanship and athletic fellowship. 

We dispense the green caps in the fall and join with the W.A.A. in 
sponsoring the election of the football queen. 

' ' M ' ' CLUB 




Left to right: G. Lagow, F. Harris, V. Donaldson, M. Holmes, L. Walker, H. Gay, B. Logan, A. Hinson. 



ASKETBALL 




ELVIS ROSENBERGER, Freshman 
Centralia . . . Guard 

"Rosie" comes from the basketball center of 
Southern Illinois. Sporting the two-handed kiss 
shot and plenty of speed, "Rosie" put forth readi- 
ly for the Bearcats Although small in stature, he 
played steadily and with success against all op- 
position. 

WILLIAM GREGORY, Freshman 
Lebanon . . . Forward 

"Bill" was the boy who scored so consistently 
for the Bearcats. That deadly one-handed shot 
added numerous baskets to the Bearcats' score. 
Outstanding offensively, "Bill" was also good de- 
fensively. Always playing good steady ball, Greg- 
ory stopped many a rally by the opposition. Greg- 
ory's best shot percentage was in the Greenville 
game here. He caged 9 baskets out of 10 shots 
in the first half. "Bill" will be a valuable factor 
in the future Bearcat quintets. 

RICHARD PITTENGER, Freshman 
Pocahontas . . . Guard 

"Dick" was one of the most dependable men on 
the hardwood. His ball-handling ability was out- 
standing. Feeding passes to teammates for shots 
was his specialty. Never getting excited, "Dick" 
played the same brand of ball no matter what the 
score might be. This lad should prove a valuable 
asset to future Bearcat teams. 

MASON HOLMES, Sophomore 
East St. Louis . . . Center 

Playing his second season in a Bearcat uniform, 
"Mace" has shown much improvement on the hard- 
wood. His tireless spirit and rebound ability were 
valuable factors to the Bearcats. 



JOHN CURTIS, Freshman 
Mt. Vernon . . . Guard 

Curtis was a solid stone in the building of the 
Bearcat five. Always dependable and alert, Johnny 
caged many goals on the opposition. Ability and 
speed permitted him to play excellent ball at all 
times. 



DON WEHRLE, Freshman 
Trenton . . . Forward 

Improving rapidly from the start and having the 
will to win, Don became a regular and played his 
best game at home against Harris Teachers. He 
will be a handy man to have around next year. 



KENNETH HARLAN, Freshman 
Medora . . . Forward 

"Kenny" was one of the Bearcats' dependable 
reserves. He played a good steady game at all 
times, and was accurate with his one-handed push 
shot. Experience will turn this lad into a good 
hardwood veteran for future Bearcat teams. 



MIKE KATAYAMA, Freshman 
Unity . . . Guard 

Mike played good, steady basketball all season. 
He was outstanding as a ball handler. His cool- 
ness under fire was effective on the opposition. 
Mike was always there and could be counted upon 
to bring the ball across the line. 



BASKETBALL SCHEDULE 







McK, 

45 

41 


Opp 
71 
78 
64 
55 
53 
60 
50 
75 
63 
. 53 
69 
56 
38 
47 
49 
47 
44 
63 
51 
65 






Shurtleff 




jf < i J 


Quincy 


.. 53 
66 






59 






Centralis Township Junior College 


63 

62 






Eureka _ 


51 

48 


11 






Oakland City 


45 

49 








58 






Principia 

Centralia Township Junior College .._ 

Lincoln Bible Institute 

Oakland City 


51 

59 

_ 57 

- 85 




WESLEY JONAH 


ROBERT BRANN 


Coach 


Shurtleff 


84 

78 


Manager 






75 






Eureka - — 


71 





KENNETH AUSTIN, Freshman 
Evansville . . . Guard 

"Burly Q" is a good defensive man and when in 
action is an asset to the team's defensive stands. 
With experience and practice, this well-built player 
will become more potent on both defense and 
offense. 



GLEASON LAGOW, Junior 
luka . . . Forward 

"Joe" is the smallest man on this year's team 
and is also the only upperclassman on the team. 
Even though his height handicaps him some, "Joe" 
is always fighting when in the game. 



VICTOR DONALDSON, Sophomore 
Shobonier . . . Guard 

"Vic" was a game and dependable defensive man 
for the Cats. Playing good, steady basketball was 
the outstanding feature produced by Donaldson. 
"Vic" was in there on all rebounds and always did 
his share to spark the Bearcats to victory. 



JOHN WINKLER, Freshman 
Trenton . . . Guard 

McKendree's fighting ball hawk, is one way to 
describe Winkler on the hardwood. John was the 
team's best defensive man, and quite often he 
scored on his accurate one-handed shots. Ability, 
willingness, and the desire to play basketball en- 
abled Winkler to play good, heady basketball for 
the Bearcats. 



Jk 


% \Ml 


i 


^ 1 


w!l 


*-ws^ 


r^ 


t 


f\ 


1 

• * 


W v 



CHEERLEADERS 




Left to right: D. Faulkner, E. Jones, D. Goddard, H. Poole, D. Hinson, N. McRaven, B. Ford. 



CHEERLEADERS 

The cheerleaders, in their purple and white, did a grand job of 
leading McKendree's cheering section through both the football and 
basketball season. The cheerleaders could always be heard above 
anyone else. They were always on the job at every game with their 
snappy yells and familiar routines. 



WOMEN'S ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 

The Women's Athletic Association, organized for the purpose of 
encouraging healthful living, good-will, and fellowship among stu- 
dents, has increased its membership this year to twenty-seven. 

The W. A. A. sponsored several social functions for the entire 
school and has organized a volley ball and a basketball team 

The president of W. A. A. attended a state meeting at Jackson- 
ville, Illinois, for the purpose of gaining information for the better- 
ment of the organization. 



W . A . A 




Left to right. J. Harris, M. Alexander, B. Bugh, M. Voyles, E. Crisp, M. Michels, M. Struthers, B. Seabury, D. Goddard, D. Hinson, J. Klein- 
schmidt, H. Irvin, E. Jones, N. McRaven, M Pummil, D. Faulkner, M Matthies, M. Cozart, F. Wilson, E Hanbaum, J Smith, P. Cocart. 



[[HUH 




vl/L, lAJkat cyioueiu SJimed Jhe$e Were 



Why so happy, Frances? Flee Circus 

With Pepsodent! Mix-up Chesty 

Hobo King Fan Dancer Tilt Darwin was wrong Dungeon visitors 



HOME-COMING 




HOME-COMING QUEEN 

After perhaps the most heated campaign in the history of McKendree Home-comings,. 
Doris Phillips Brown was finally selected by her fellow students to reign over the events 
of the day. Her coronation, impressively staged in the school's ancient Chapel, added 
much color to an already festive occasion. 

Doris, a sophomore from East St. Louis, is extremely popular with both her faculty 
and student associates. As a McKendree girl, she represents a perfect blending of personal- 
ity, beauty, and ability. More than one college organization takes pride in the fact that 
Queen Doris I is among its members. 

This recently acquired royalty has not been her only recognition on the hill. Doris 
has been elected to membership in such organizations as Sigma Tau Delta, Clio, and the 
International Students' Society. She has served untiringly as one of the school's cheer 
leaders and on the staffs of both the McKendrean and the McKendree Review. 

The presence of lovely Doris Phillips Brown as Home-coming Queen is among the 
pleasant memories to be cherished by students, faculty members, and returning graduates 
who were here for McKendree's annual reunion. 



HOME-COMING PROGRAM 
Thursday. October 31, 1946 

Pep Session in Eisenmayer Gymnasium at 8:00 

Friday, November 1, 1946 

Hobo Day Program in Gymnasium at 11:20 

Sack Luncheon in Pearson's Dining Hall at 12 noon 

Crowning of Home-coming Queen in Chapel at 8:00 

Freshman Formal Chapel Program at 8:15 

Open House in both dorms and reception in Clark 
Hall at 9:30 

Saturday, November 2, 1946 

Literary Society Exhibition at 10:30 

Alumni Dinner in Pearson's Hall at 12:00 

Football Game with Macomb on Hypes Field at 2:30 



MAY QUEEN COURT 




Left to right: P. Ladas, M. Struthers, E. Rosenberger, J. Klemschmidt, G. Troutt, D. Phillips Brown (Queen), A. Geist, B. Ford, S. Simpson, 
E. Crisp. 



MAY FETE 




MAY QUEEN 

According to Mr. Webster, the word "crown" denotes anything which imparts 
beauty, splendor, or honor. The crowning of pretty Miriam Michels as 1947 May Queen 
certainly is in accord with that definition. 

Miriam, a music student from Carlyle, was selected by vote of the student body to 
reign over the annual May Fete. Her elevation to the McKendree royal family comes as a 
fitting climax to a most successful college career. Miriam's talents are not confined to just 
being able to pose for beautiful pictures. An honor student, she was one of four McKen- 
dreans selected for a national "Who's Who" of American college students; she served as 
president of McKendree's honorary English fraternity; she played one of the leading roles 
in the play "Blithe Spirit." No recital or musical program could be considered complete 
without featuring Miss Michels as a pianist or vocalist or as both. 

The colorful May Day festivities were held on McKendree's naturally beautiful north 
campus. Miss Dorothy Lee Faulkner of Granite City, also a pretty and popular co-ed, 
served as the queen's maid-of-honor. 



SENIOR CHAPEL PROGRAM 

(May 23. 1947) 

Organ Prelude Miriam Michels 

Invocation Richard Howe 

Hymn 

Scripture.. Frances Shaffer 

Piano Duet.... Glotfelty - Faulkner 

Class H istory Joanne Bare 

Vocal Solo Allen Sager 

Class Will.— Bernard Logan 

Piano Solo .....Betty Ford 

Class Prophecy Louise Krumeich 

Trio 

Presentation of Gavel... .James Oppitz 

Response Lou is Wa Iker 

Presentation of Gift Paul Salmon 

Hymn 

Alma Mater 

Postlude Miriam Michels 



TREE DEDICATION 

Chairman Leslie Purdy 

Invocation Joanne Bare 

Music Octette 

Remarks Dr. West Hohn 

Presentation of Tree Arthur Hinson 

Response Dr. Carl C. Bracy 

Alma Mater 




WHO'S WHO 




Miriam Michels, with her abilities in various fields, is an exception to the "beautiful but dumb" 
axiom. In addition to an outstanding academic record, Miriam has demonstrated her skill as a pianist, 
actress, vocalist, and leader in various clubs and organizations. 

James Oppitz, a son of two of McKendree's teachers, established a reputation of his own here on 
the campus. By his diversified interests, he gained leadership in dramatics, debating and oratory, and 
journalism. Jim has been a familiar figure at McKendree for many years. 




As president of the Student Association, Leslie Purdy has played an important role on the hill. His 
classroom work has been scholarly and he's been a leader in many organizations and activities. Les com- 
mands the respect of his many associates for his ability to get things done. 

Rebecca Giles, a former editor of the McKendree Review and president of Sigma Tau Delta, has 
achieved an enviable reputation as a writer. The fine spirit, with which Beckie has entered into almost any 
task assigned her, is indeed highly commendable. 



I 



[ 




\AJltk l^ride lA/e l\evlew Lsur ^Atccomptiskmentd 

Sunday afternoon No vacancies Missing — one steeple 

Angel's roost Springtime Old-timer 

Autumn scene Land mark Oldest and Best A tree 



THE CLASS OF '47 

Though the war has been over close to two years, our class still shows 
its effects. Twenty-three students will receive their diplomas, but only five of 
this number are from the original class of twenty-five starting college on that 
memorable September day in 1943. 

The balance of this year's graduating class is composed of students 
who have had their college careers interrupted for various reasons. We 
have our share of ex-G. I.'s who have returned to the Old Hill. 

Many are the memories we retain from these four years at McKendree. 
From the first sight we caught of our future Alma Mater to our last glimpse 
of the chapel spire as we leave the campus we have experienced all of the 
fun and work that can be experienced in four years. 

Never to be forgotten are our freshman picnic and initiation. Even 
with three girls in the chapel tower we still couldn't ring the bell— maybe it 
was the lack of sufficient food on the picnic. As a result of our failure we 
submitted to initiation of dips in Lake Beautiful and walks through an un- 
known countryside at late hours of the night. 

Included in that freshman year are memories of "the Dean." No 
freshman comp. class was or ever will be like that one in '43-'44. Nor is it 
likely that the dean of women will stack rooms or have hers stacked again. 
Ours was a most earnest and devout class — each time we practiced 
our rain dance in P. E. we were rewarded with the sound of a downpour. 
Maybe those who had cut class to go to Belleville every chance they had 
were responsible, though. 

Our sophomore year had its share of "happenings," too — especially 
that picnic in the rain. We did find shelter, though, didn't we? Plato's punch 
got tampered with that year — wonder who was mixed up in that? 

The hey day of night classes occurred during our sophomore and 
junior classes — how long that two hours seemed each week. The shortest 
evening class in history was a certain social science class under the instruc- 
tion of Dr. Yost. It wasn't exactly a complete boycott — the commuters were 
there. "Naughty Marietta" was worth seeing, though, wasn't it? — even if we 
did have 1,500-word papers to write as punishment. 

The next year saw the arrival of Dr. Bracy on the campus. Though 
we couldn't visualize Dr. Yost leaving, Dr. Bracy soon won his place on the 
campus and in our college activities as our president. 

Each year marked our attempt to keep the freshmen from ringing the 
chapel bell. Never has anything sounded as weird as the S.O.S. sounded 
by Pete and Roy at 6 a. m. That year we'd been so careful, too — even stood 
watch in shifts one night when a false alarm of the freshmen's departure was 
spread. 

Summer school with its institute, preachers' school, and all of the work 
that accompanied them are land marks in our college experience. 

Waitresses, waiters, and dish room helpers have had members of our 
class in their ranks for all special occasions on the campus. From our class 
came the ideas for High School Day and all-college leaf raking. 

Because of the man-shortage the girls in our class assumed much of 
the work usually done by the fellows. For one and a half years we had 
but one boy in the class. Many are the hours spent unloading Booth Festi- 
val supplies, accompanied by Dr. Yost's encouraging electioneering, with 
pennies and pencils instead of cigars. Girl bellringers, potato peelers, pot 
and pan dish washers, and janitors were no novelty. 

Midnight snacks of smuggled sandwiches, Clark Hall house meetings, 
McKendrean trips, walks to the channel, glee club, sextette, and "Y" trips, 
dorm fights, singing in the reception hall, serenades, and skating parties all 
go to make up our college memories. 

Small classes are coming to be a thing of the past, but long will we 
remember and appreciate the special opportunity we had in "larnin'." 

We hope that we have met the challenge and opportunities of college 
life in the best possible manner. We are proud to say we're McKendreans 
and hope that as the years go by we will be able to make McK proud of us. 



THE CLASS OF '48 

The class of '48, as Juniors on the Old Hill this year, are beginning to 
feel the weight and responsibility of being upperclassmen. As true McKen- 
dreans, our highest hopes are to uphold the traditions and ideals of our school. 

Yes, our picnic was a failure as far as ringing the bell was concerned. 
However, then our fun ball started rolling, which made up for initiation. We 
entertained the school with our Freshman Formal Program, and ourselves 
with a wiener roast. Our all-freshman basketball team sailed through an 
undefeated season. 

As sophomores we sponsored an all-school skating party to start a 
new semester in high. 

This year we sponsored a much-enjoyed hayride, complete with cider 
and doughnuts. Our officers are Louis Walker, president; Eunice Hanbaum, 
vice-president; Elizabeth Crisp, secretary-treasurer. 

As we accept our duties as seniors next year, we hope to remain 
faithful to our highest aims, and, in years to come, make McKendree proud 
to claim us as her sons and daughters. 



THE CLASS OF '49 

The class of '49 was the first to enroll at McKendree College after the 
close of World War II. Our first year here on the Old Hill proved to be a 
memorable one. We wore our green caps and bowed respectfully to upper- 
classmen, but secretly felt exalted because of our picnic and its great climax 
— the ringing of the chapel bell. We saw a freshman girl chosen to rule as 
Home-coming Queen and crowned at our formal chapel program. Our class 
took an active part throughout the school year in all activities and was sur- 
prised to find the first year at college had ended so quickly. 

This year, as sophomores, we have gained many new members. And 
again, we've rejoiced to have a member of our class elected to reign as 
Home-coming Queen. We, the Sophomore Class, have enjoyed our two years 
of college life, and are eagerly looking forward to two more memory-making 
years at McKendree. 



THE CLASS OF '50 

When we timidly tripped along Centennial Walk early last fall, we 
were as green as the lush campus surrounding McKendree's picturesque old 
halls. A year on College Hill, however, has sufficed to effect a change which 
has left us far better equipped to face the world than we were upon entering 
school. We anticipate with pleasure the forthcoming years which will further 
develop our talents and leave us with a host of happy memories. 

Among our accomplishments which have served to establish us on the 
Old Hill, the most graitfying was the chapel bell and the cessation of initia- 
tion hostilities. We displayed our talent and seriousness in a formal chapel 
program which gave promise of the future. At this chapel program the 
Freshmen saw their candidate serving as first maid of honor to the Home- 
coming Queen, and on the athletic field they have contributed their brawn 
and brain to the sports which are representative of the excellence of their 
alma mater. A new year and new Freshmen have left their glow on the 
post-war campus of McKendree College. 



CALENDAR OF EVENTS 



SEPTEMBER 

9 



Registration begins with 215 students, most 

of them new, crowding the hill. 
Registration continued. Freshman English 

test given. 
Classes organized. An all-school picnic and 

informal dorm parties. 
YM and YW Mixer— putty, putty. 
President's formal reception — 8:00 'til late. 
Southern Illinois Conference approves Mc- 

Kendree's plan to raise a million for 

buildings and endowment. 



6 Classes resumed. 

8 Intramural basketball tournament, spon- 
sored by Gl Club, begins with Bombers, 
Hot Rocks, Campus Caballeros, Jokers, 
and Los Gatos as the contenders. 
13 Philo Open Session. 
20 — Semester exams begin. 

28 Enrollment swells to 246 in registration for 

second semester. 

29 Back to the grind — classes organized. 



OCTOBER 

7 Clio Open Session. 

8 Philo Pledge Banquet. 

12 McKendree joins Pioneer Conference with 

Eureka, Shurtleff, and Quincy. 
14 Philo Open Session. Freshman Party. 

18 Gl Club skating party 

19 Our first football game since 1941. Milli- 

on, 39; McK., 0. 
26 Junior Class sponsors hayride, complete with 

moon and hay. 
29 Freshman informal chapel program. 
31 Pep meeting in Old Eisenmayer. 



NOVEMBER 

1 Hobo Day and sack luncheon in the morn- 

ing Crowning of home-coming queen, 
formal freshman program and dormitory 
open house in the evening. 

2 Home-coming Day. Literary society exhibi- 

tion, alumni luncheon, and football game. 
Macomb, 14; McK., 0. 

8 Report cards came out today — too bad. 

1 5 Dr. Gaston Foote of Dayton, Ohio, speaks 
in Chapel. Review celebrates 25th birth- 
day. 

21 Basketball: Plato, 45; Philo, 36. 

25 Formal Thanksgiving dinner followed by a 

Gay Nineties Revue. 

26 Gl Club Chapel program Thanksgiving re- 

cess begins. 



DECEMBER 



2 Classes resumed. 

10 W F Powell speaks in Chapel on his Pan- 
American tour. 

15 Miss Carla Caldwell's college choir pre- 
sents Handel's Messiah, featuring a 
chorus of 60 voices and guest soloists, 
Mary Ferguson File, Robert Herman, and 
Ralph Gould. 

18 SCA Christmas Party. Philo Pledge Banquet, 

19 A real Christmas present — our first ath- 

letic victory! McK., 66; Greenville, 53. 

20 Mason Holmes wins ping-pong tournament. 

Christmas recess begins. 



FEBRUARY 

1 Rabbi Edward Zerin speaks in Chapel. 
10 Miss Mary Metz joins faculty as instructor 

in Biology. 
17 Plato Open Session. 

20 Dr. Harold G. Trost speaks at annual ob- 
servance of Founders' Day. 

26 Music department presents public recital. 

27 Dr. Roy Short, editor of the Upper Room, 

speaks in Chapel. 



MARCH 

17 Dr. Foote is with us again for Religious 
Emphasis Week. 

27 Stunt Show, sponsored by the McKendrean. 

28 Report cards again. Easter recess begins. 



APRIL 

7 Classes resumed. 
18 High School Day. 



Chorus Spring Concert. 

Mary Ellen Glotfelty presents voice recital. 

May Fete and Senior Day Exercises. 

Final examinations begin — ain't it grand to 



be a seniorr 1 
Dorris Oratorical Contest. 
Philo-Clio- Plato exhibition. 
Music Recital. 



JUNE 

1 Baccalaureate Service. Oratorio. 

2 Meeting of Joint Board. 

3 Alumni Dinner and Commencement Exer- 

cises. 




\A/e JLook ijach before [^roceedin^ LJn 



PATRONS' LIST 



Mrs. Cleda Wade Lebanon 

Rev. C. L. Peterson ----..... Fairfield 
Rev. Farrell Jenkins ----.... East S t. Louis 
Mr. F. H. Behymer - - ....... Lebanon 

Rev. H. G. Hurley - - . Lebanon 

Rev. T. B. Sowers --------- Mt. Vernon 

Mrs. Genevieve Reisner Lebanon 

Mr. and Mrs. James Loy ------ . Granite City 

Mr. H. P. Barnes - - ---..__ Harrisburg 

Rev. Harry Brown --...... Signal Hm 

Mr. and Mrs. Malcom Randall ------ E ast g t- L ouis 

Miss Laverne Book ------.___ Bluford 

Dr. R. C. Berry - - ^ ------ - Livingston 

Dr. A. L. Weler -------- Upland, California 

Ethel Dewhirst ---... . . Houma, Louisiana 

Earl C. Phillips - - - - olney 

Rev. F. C. Mery - Houman, Louisiana 

J. W. A. Kinison - Litchfield 

Earl Stadge - - - Chester 

Mr. and Mrs. R. E. Whitson - East St. Louis 

Etta Root Edwards - . p ic kneyville 

Lisle Mewmaw -------- p av illion, Wyoming 

Mrs. Chas. Biggerstaff -------- East St Louis 

Ruth Koerber Belleville 

Gehl Devore - - Westmont 

Art Werle " - East St. Louis 

CC.Lowe Olmstead 

Cyril Curtis - -----..___ Urbana 

Hyla Gawthorp - Lake Villa 

Edna Kampmeyer - Caseyville 

Mr. and Mrs. Art Hinson -------- Altamon* 

Maxine Ball - Mt _ li V e 

Lewis Winterrowd Lebanon 

Peter Notaras - DuQuoin 



Dan Hertenstein 



O'Fallon 



Clifford Hertenstein . Beloit/ Wisconsin 

Dorothy Hertenstein Kippes ----- Kennwick, Washington 
Harold Hertenstein - - - ...... Belleville 

Mary Etta Reed Hertenstein - Belleville 

Calvin Ryan - - . . Mt VemQn 

Mary Ellen Glotfelty --------- Lebanon 

Robert Stadge ------__.. Fairfield 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Dannenbrink - - State College, Pennsylvania 
Mr. and Mrs. Carl Brocks ------- Greenville 

Mr. and Mrs. Cy. Verniers - - - - . . Belleville 

Mr. and Mrs. John Godwin ---..., Lebanon 

Virginia Childress Fairfield 

Rev. O. F. Whitlock --------- Lebanon 

Margaret Harshbarger - - Fairfield 



BENSINGER F. & S. CO. 




1005-09 Market Blvd. 


ST. LOUIS DAIRY CO. 


ST. LOUIS (1), MO. 


Established 78 Years Ago to 


• 


Promote Better Health 


Food Preparing and Serving 


In the Community We Serve 


Equipment and Supplies 


• 






Compliments 


GRADE "A" DAIRY PRODUCTS 


Ledwidge Business Machines 


From the World's Finest Dairy Plant 


All Makes of Portable Typewriters 

Rebuilt Desk Typewriters 

Adding Machines 

Cash Registers 


• 

BELLEVILLE BRANCH 
Phone Belleville 2480 


701 Missouri Avenue 


BELLEVILLE, ILLINOIS 


EAST ST. LOUIS, ILLINOIS 




COLLEGE SUPPLIES AND 
FOUNTAIN PENS 


SCHWAR2 BROS. 


Try Our Soda Fountain 


FURNITURE 


We Serve DeLuxe Ice Cream 





and Toasted Sandwiches 




LEBANON DRUG CO. 

0. C. FRESHOUR, R.Ph. 


Phone 33 

O'FALLON, ILLINOIS 


The Lebanon 
Advertiser 


BUSCHER HOTEL 
CAFE 


• 


Phone 60 


LEON H. CHURCH 


Lebanon, Illinois 


EDITOR AND PUBLISHER 





INDUSTRIAL . . . 


Klasing Motor Co. 


CASEYVILLE . . . 


Trenton, Illinois 


OTALLON . . . 


Friendly, Complete Service 


BELLEVILLE . . . 


We Repair All Makes of Cars 


• 

BUS LINES 


Phone 116 


GAS . . . OIL . . . TIRES 


OTallon Phone 45 


BATTERIES . . . ACCESSORIES 


Collinsville Phone 1273 


STORAGE 




KAISER - FRAZER 


• 


Authorized Service 


'We Specialize In Short Trips' 


Waggoner-Jones Motor Co. 




Phone 35 




Lebanon, Illinois 


L. ALLEN & SONS 


DEUTCH'S 


Since 1Q01 


If It's Clothes— We Have It 


COMPLETE OUTFITTERS FOR 
MEN, WOMEN AND CHILDREN 


17 W. Main 


OTallon, Illinois 


Belleville, Illinois 




PRINK 
A&ITE 
TO EAT 



WHY NOT HAVE QUALITY WORK 




FOR THE SAME PRICE? 

PARIS 
CLEANING and DYEING 

Cleaning By the 


Kroger Grocery 

and 

Bakery Company 


Modern Method 


Lebanon, Illinois 


Phone Lebanon 136 




C. HEER 




GENERAL 


Compliments 


MERCHANDISE 


of 


• 


KOCH'S 


The Quality Store 


5c TO $1.00 STORE 



Daily Capacity, 600 Barrels 
Elevator Capacity, 200,000 Bushels 



PFEFFER MILLING COMPANY 

INC. 1899 

LEBANON, ILLINOIS 

Manufacturers of 

MAR'S PATENT HARD WINTER WHEAT FLOUR 

FLUFFY RUFFLES SELF-RISING FLOUR 

LEBANON BELLE CAKE FLOUR 



Dealers In 
LUMBER AND BUILDING MATERIALS 



A Most Pleasant Welcome 




Awaits You At All Times At 


LEBANON COAL, ICE 


BILL'S 


AND FEED CO. 


For Good Fountain Service 




Gifts For All Occasions 


Schuetz and Madison Streets 


CONFECTIONERY, 


LEBANON, ILLINOIS 


JEWELRY, 




ETC. 






Compliments 


• 


of 


DAUMUELLER'S 


MEYER 


MUSIC AND GIFT SHOP 


FURNITURE & UNDERTAKING 


215-217 West St. Louis Street 


Established 1SH 


LEBANON, ILLINOIS 


LEBANON, ILLINOIS 


MONKEN 




MERCANTILE CO. 


BLUMENSTEIN 


"The Store of Service" 




GROCERIES . . . DRY GOODS 


BROS. 


HARDWARE . . . SHOES 




Phone 117 


FRESH and SMOKED 


LEBANON. ILLINOIS 


MEATS 


PURIFIED GAS CO. 


• 


Gas and Electrical Appliances 






Phone 113 


Phone 111 






LEBANON, ILLINOIS 


O'FALLON, ILLINOIS 


— 



COMPLIMENTS 
of the 

Illinois State Cleaners 

Lebanon, Illinois 

KLEIN'S CLOTHING 
AND DRY GOODS 

CLOTHING FOR EVERY MEMBER 
OF THE FAMILY 

117 West St. Louis Street 

LEBANON, ILLINOIS 



I PESKIND & SONS 

116-118 E. Main Street 

Outfitters for 
MEN and WOMEN 



BELLEVILLE, ILLINOIS 



^^ OH BOY! 




H. & H. TRUCK SERVICE 



E. G. HASEMAN, Owner 

108 East State Street 
O'FALLON, ILLINOIS 



Coal and General Hauling 



Residence 23-R 



PHONES 



Business 283 



fOEGELE'S STIIIIII 



1010 Laurel Street 
HIGHLAND, ILLINOIS 

"Let 
Us 

Serve 
You" 



HIGH GRADE PORTRAITS . . . 

ENLARGING . . . KODAK FINISHING 

. . . APPLICATION PICTURES 

Write Us For Prices 
PHONE 63-R A. F. VOEGELE 



COMPLIMENTS 



OF 



GEM THEATRE 



The Entertainment Center 

of 

Clinton County" 



TRENTON, ILLINOIS 




Compliments 


Compliments 


of 


of 


COLLEGE 


ALAMO THEATRE 


BOOKSTORE 


Lebanon, Illinois 



PATRONIZE 

OUR 
ADVERTISERS 



THE CALL 
PRINTING 
COMPANY 



DAN A. & A. J. THROOP, Mgrs. 



PRINTING SERVICE SINCE 1904 



"Talent to Originate 
. . . Skill to Produce" 



PHONE EAST 4204 

BROADWAY AT THIRD EAST ST. LOUIS, ILL 



BERT'S CONFECTIONERY 

SODA FOUNTAIN, NEWSSTAND, 
BAKERY 

"Where Trenton-McK Meet" 

Phone 21 

TRENTON, ILLINOIS 



Davis Clothing Co. 

MEN . . BOYS' CLOTHING 
"It It's New, We Have It" 

Trenton, Illinois 



To McKendree College . 
May It Ever Grow 



COMPLIMENTS 
of the 

FIRST NATIONAL BANK 

of 

LEBANON 

LEBANON, ILLINOIS 



MEMBER OF THE FEDERAL DEPOSIT 
INSURANCE CORPORATION 



, IL 62254